11 Mar 2021

Locomotor disorders from nutritional origin



AUTHOR

Francisco Portela

Diamond V

Content available in: Español (Spanish)

FRANCISCO PORTELA

Manager of development of the poultry market in Latin America and Canada for Diamond V From July 2014 to the present, he works at Diamond V, supporting the Poultry Market’s development for Spain, Portugal, Latin America, and Canada. Engineer Portela has published several scientific and industrial articles in different magazines of the Poultry Industry. He also has a long career in the poultry industry (Shur-Gain Grain Division of Canada Packers Inc, Shaver Poultry Breeding, ISA Breeders, Hubbard Breeders, and British United Turkeys, Hy-Line International).

 

POINTS TO CONSIDER

  • Nutritional problems and diseases which affect digestion and nutrients absorption could lead to locomotor problems.
  • The production at the lowest cost and the substitution of ingredients to make the feed cheaper leaves us with very few options when there are problems in the grains or the minerals do not have the proper concentration.
  • We must resort to additives that improve the absorption of nutrients and give us safety margins to avoid locomotor problems, diseases, and perhaps high mortality.

After many decades of global nutritional research, field trials, and multiple management programs tailored for each production zone, we continue to see nutritional problems in broilers, especially locomotor problems.

A fundamental rationale in poultry nutrition tells us that for a broiler to reach the genetic potential established by the genetic lines, it has to consume the necessary nutrients to satisfy its nutritional demands.

This will result in bird flocks reaching market age with the recommended weights and with good uniformity. But when there are nutritional and disease problems that affect the digestion and absorption of nutrients, this can lead to locomotor problems. If we speak strictly of locomotor problems from a nutritional origin, we should monitor the following aspects:

 

INGREDIENTS QUALITY

  1. Correct moisture
  2. Fungus free
  3. Broken grain percentage
  4. Correct bromatological analysis

CORRECT DIET FORMULATION FOR THE ADEQUATE FEEDING PROGRAM

  1. Nutritionist
  2. Nutrition respecting the local restrictions such as: ease of buying local ingredients, vitamins, and minerals

INGREDIENTS MIXING IN THE FEED MILL

  1. Accomplish all regulations
  2. Omission errors

SIZE AND SEGREGATION OF INGREDIENTS (% OF FINES)

  1. Quality (either of the pellet or the correct grinding of the grain)

PUT IN THE HOPPERS THE CORRECT FEED FOR THE TYPE OF BIRD WE ARE TRYING TO FEED

  1. Shipping errors

 

UNIFORMITY IN THE ENVIRONMENT TO STIMULATE NUTRIENT CONSUMPTION

(assuming the feed is in optimal condition)

  1. Water
  2. Ventilation
  3. Temperature
  4. Lighting and Light programs
  5. Vital space
  6. Litter quality
  7. Correct equipment and handling of that equipment.
  8. Driving
  9. Labor Awareness

 

Nutritional problems and diseases which affect digestion and nutrients absorption could lead to locomotor problems.

Of course, they are only a few points. There will be many more, and that due to lack of time are not mentioned. If everything is correct and monitored, why do we speak of locomotor disorders from nutritional origin? Well, I think the answers can include bird genetics, their requirements to achieve the established goals, a poor nutritional matrix, and definitely a malfunction of the digestive system, which can be affected due to a microbial imbalance, poor intestinal integrity, and a lack of metabolites necessary for the correct production of chicken meat.

The less energy the animal spends on locomotion, the more weight it will have, but less capacity to exercise its legs, and perhaps over time, it will weaken.

The formation of the bones and cartilage necessary for locomotion requires the correct and balanced digestion of the minerals that compose it, energy, amino acids necessary for growth, and good management of the litter, feeders, and drinkers. The less energy the animal spends on locomotion, the more weight it will have, but less capacity to exercise its legs, and perhaps over time, it will weaken.

Thanks to research in the development of the intestinal microbiota, there are products on the market that are added to the diet to improve intestinal integrity, increase the size and thickness of the villi, which help increase the absorption of minerals and other nutrients necessary for the formation of bones and muscles. These additives can also reduce or eliminate pathogenic bacteria over time, that producing an infection, waste energy, and amino acids in mitigating its effects. Also, additives can help alleviate mycotoxins’ effects that negatively affect the immune system and minerals absorption, amino acids, and carbohydrates necessary for production.

 

CONCLUSIONS

In conclusion, production at the lowest cost and the substitution of ingredients to make feed cheaper leaves us with very few options when there are problems in the grains or minerals with improper concentration.  That is why we must resort to additives that help us improve the absorption of nutrients and give ourselves safety margins to avoid locomotor problems, diseases, and perhaps high mortality.



 

MAGAZINE

 


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